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Trinity Daily Prayer

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Saturday, 29 September 2012

Role-models and School Hymns


When I was at school (Moulton Comprehensive)  Praise my soul the king of heaven was the school hymn. The headmaster, Mr Scott, would walk around the school and recite a line of the hymn and we would have to recite the following line - he did the same thing with the school poem, Kipling's 'If'. I got to know Mr Scott rather well because having come into one of my lessons and noticing my appalling handwriting he insisted for two years that I show him my homework every morning and teachers were not to mark it until he had signed it in his familiar green ink. It was a rather special relationship, he was ex-military and unlike me in many ways but I admired him greatly and he is undoubtedly one of my role models in headship. The important thing is that I really believed he knew me, I aspire to this as a headteacher for my pupils.  I'll perhaps say more about him and other important influences on me another time.
Well, we don' have a school hymn at Trinity yet. The houses are named after the three well known Archangels and Zadkiel, the Hebrew means righteousness or justice of God. 

I have started a verse for Zadkiel below. The rest of the text is by Aelred-Seton Shanley Obl.OSB Cam.
He died some years ago, so if anyone can help .....
(I think there might be a school competition in this).

This is what Wikipedia has on Zadkiel:


"Zadkiel or Hesediel (Heb. צדקיאל Tzadqiel, "Righteousness of God") is the archangel of freedom, benevolence, mercy, and the Patron Angel of all who forgive. Also known as Sachiel, Zedekiel, Zadakiel, Tzadkiel, Zedekul and Hesediel. Rabbinical tradition considers him to be the angel of mercy.
 Zadkiel was said to be the Angel who prevented Abraham from sacrificing his son, Isaac.
In rabbinic writings Zadkiel belongs to the order of Hashmallim (equated with the Dominations or Dominions), and considered by some sources to be chief of that order (others sources name Hashmal or Zacharael). InMaseket Azilut Zadkiel/Hesediel is listed as co-chief with Gabriel of the order of Shinanim. As an angel of mercy, some texts claim that Zadkiel is the unnamed Biblical Angel of the Lord who holds back Abraham to prevent the patriarch from sacrificing his son, and because of this is usually shown holding a dagger. Other texts cite Michael or Tadhiel or some other angel as the angel intended, while others interpret the Angel of the Lord as a theophany.
Zadkiel is one of two standard bearers (along with Jophiel) who follow directly behind Michael as the head archangel enters battle. Zadkiel is associated with the color violet.
 Zadkiel or Hesediel (Heb. צדקיאל Tzadqiel, "Righteousness of God") is the archangel of freedom, benevolence, mercy, and the Patron Angel of all who forgive. Also known as Sachiel, Zedekiel, Zadakiel, Tzadkiel, Zedekul and Hesediel. Rabbinical tradition considers him to be the angel of mercy.
 Zadkiel was said to be the Angel who prevented Abraham from sacrificing his son, Isaac.
In rabbinic writings Zadkiel belongs to the order of Hashmallim (equated with the Dominations or Dominions), and considered by some sources to be chief of that order (others sources name Hashmal or Zacharael). InMaseket Azilut Zadkiel/Hesediel is listed as co-chief with Gabriel of the order of Shinanim. As an angel of mercy, some texts claim that Zadkiel is the unnamed Biblical Angel of the Lord who holds back Abraham to prevent the patriarch from sacrificing his son, and because of this is usually shown holding a dagger. Other texts cite Michael or Tadhiel or some other angel as the angel intended, while others interpret the Angel of the Lord as a theophany.
Zadkiel is one of two standard bearers (along with Jophiel) who follow directly behind Michael as the head archangel enters battle. Zadkiel is associated with the color violet."


Works well to the tune usually sung with Praise my soul...

You who pierce the dazzling darkness,
clothed in light and robed in flame,
rad'iant in the Holy glory
of the One whom you proclaim:
ceaseless in your rounds of worship
of the awesome, nameless Name:

Michael, guard of heaven's threshold,
just defender at each death,
be the prosecutor's downfall
as you plead our second birth;
clothed in Christ - his light our armour,
pilot us to heaven's berth.

Gabriel, who bear God's greeting,
to all those who strain to hear;
your's the word that, borne in silence,
to the silent heart draws near:
fragrant burns the evening incense
in the temple you appear.

Raphael, who guided Tobit,
plying your physician's art:
be companion on our journey
pointing out where roads must part.
Lead us safely through life's dangers
to the stronghold of God's heart.

Zadkiel, God's call to justice,
challenging... ?????

Energies of blinding splendour
- vaster than the nebulae -
singing ceaselessly your 'sanctus'
through the flux of night and day:
school us now for that great glory
to which heav'n and earth give way.

6 comments:

  1. I thought it might go well to Beethoven's Ode to Joy, but it needs a refrain.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Zadkiel, who bade in mercy
    Abraham let Isaac live,
    Temper justice with thy kindness,
    Calm our wrath and wisdom give;
    Even as our wrongs are pardoned
    Teach us ever to forgive.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It wd be lovely:
    any help with a refrain please?
    something about school / learning or Lewisham wd be good

    ReplyDelete
  4. Here's a first pass; it can very probably be improved:

    Zadkiel, who sends God's mercy,
    love despite what deeds were done,
    holding back the arm of anger,
    showing substitute for son:
    show us too the Lord's forgiveness,
    bring us homewards one by one.


    Also, can I suggest a slight change to the Gabriel verse?

    Gabriel, who bear God's greeting,
    to each heart that strains to hear...


    Otherwise, the stress is reversed on the first foot of the second line.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is lovely thank you so much, and yes the Gabriel change is a big help

    A chorus/ refrain so it can be sung to Ode to joy ...

    ReplyDelete
  6. Something like this (given the meaning of "seraph")?

    Watch with eyes that ever burn,
    Helping Lewisham to learn.


    (Also, line 1 of my Zadkiel stanza: replace "sends" with "brings" for better sense.)

    ReplyDelete

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