Church of England Daily Prayer - Contemporay - Combined Prayer

Trinity Daily Prayer

A simple Liturgy of the Hours for singing available here.
Resources for the Liturgy stored at: Company of Voices Resources.

Thursday, 6 September 2012

Readings for Friday 7th September



Trinity 13
Friday in the 22nd Week in Ordinary Time

Additional Commemorations
Douglas Downes, Friar, founder of the Brotherhood of Saint Francis, 1957

Daily Eucharistic Lectionary
Daily Reflections from Creighton University for today.
Liturgy Alive  prayers and readings here.

The Opening Prayer:
Faithful God of tenderness and mercy,
you want us to be your people
on the march with Jesus your Son
toward a new future of justice and love.
Do not allow us to suffocate in being contented
with old habits and sluggish ways.
Help us to accept the pain
of leaving the familiar behind us
and open us to the challenge of the gospel
to become more like your Son
who guides our faltering steps,
Jesus Christ our Lord.


First Reading
1 Cor 4:1-5
1 This is how one should regard us, as servants of Christ and stewards of the mysteries of God.2 Moreover it is required of stewards that they be found trustworthy. 3 But with me it is a very small thing that I should be judged by you or by any human court. I do not even judge myself. 4 I am not aware of anything against myself, but I am not thereby acquitted. It is the Lord who judges me. 5 Therefore do not pronounce judgment before the time, before the Lord comes, who will bring to light the things now hidden in darkness and will disclose the purposes of the heart. Then every man will receive his commendation from God.


Psalm 37

Luke 5:33-end
33 And they said to him, "The disciples of John fast often and offer prayers, and so do the disciples of the Pharisees, but yours eat and drink." 34 And Jesus said to them, "Can you make wedding guests fast while the bridegroom is with them? 35 The days will come, when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast in those days." 36 He told them a parable also: "No one tears a piece from a new garment and puts it upon an old garment; if he does, he will tear the new, and the piece from the new will not match the old. 37 And no one puts new wine into old wineskins; if he does, the new wine will burst the skins and it will be spilled, and the skins will be destroyed. 38 But new wine must be put into fresh wineskins. 39 And no one after drinking old wine desires new; for he says, 'The old is good.'"

Additional Office Lectionary
2 Tim 2: 22 - 3:17
In v 16 King translates 'all Scripture is breathed by God' which has a much more living, vibrant, fluid quality than the 'inspired'. The word inspirational is so overused that it has become rather insipid.
22 So shun youthful passions and aim at righteousness, faith, love, and peace, along with those who call upon the Lord from a pure heart. 23 Have nothing to do with stupid, senseless controversies; you know that they breed quarrels. 24 And the Lord's servant must not be quarrelsome but kindly to every one, an apt teacher, forbearing, 25 correcting his opponents with gentleness. God may perhaps grant that they will repent and come to know the truth, 26 and they may escape from the snare of the devil, after being captured by him to do his will.
1 But understand this, that in the last days there will come times of stress. 2 For men will be lovers of self, lovers of money, proud, arrogant, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, 3 inhuman, implacable, slanderers, profligates, fierce, haters of good, 4 treacherous, reckless, swollen with conceit, lovers of pleasure rather than lovers of God, 5 holding the form of religion but denying the power of it. Avoid such people. 6 For among them are those who make their way into households and capture weak women, burdened with sins and swayed by various impulses, 7 who will listen to anybody and can never arrive at a knowledge of the truth. 8 As Jannes and Jambres opposed Moses, so these men also oppose the truth, men of corrupt mind and counterfeit faith; 9 but they will not get very far, for their folly will be plain to all, as was that of those two men. 10 Now you have observed my teaching, my conduct, my aim in life, my faith, my patience, my love, my steadfastness, 11 my persecutions, my sufferings, what befell me at Antioch, at Ico'nium, and at Lystra, what persecutions I endured; yet from them all the Lord rescued me. 12 Indeed all who desire to live a godly life in Christ Jesus will be persecuted, 13while evil men and impostors will go on from bad to worse, deceivers and deceived. 14 But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have firmly believed, knowing from whom you learned it 15 and how from childhood you have been acquainted with the sacred writings which are able to instruct you for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. 16 All scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, 17 that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work.

Texts of the readings Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyright 1952 [2nd edition, 1971] by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
Readings will be removed each week but other elements will be left in place.

Non Scriptural Reading

A READING FROM THE DOGMATIC CONSTITUTION ON DIVINE REVELATION OF THE SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL

Those divinely revealed realities which are contained and presented in Sacred Scripture have been committed to writing under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit. For holy mother Church, relying on the belief of the Apostles, holds that the books of both the Old and New Testaments in their entirety, with all their parts, are sacred and canonical because, written under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, they have God as their author and have been handed on as such to the Church herself. In composing the sacred books, God chose men and while employed by him they made use of their powers and abilities, so that with him acting in them and through them, they, as true authors, consigned to writing everything and only those things which he wanted.
Therefore, since everything asserted by the inspired authors or sacred writers must be held to be asserted by the Holy Spirit, it follows that the books of Scripture must be acknowledged as teaching solidly, faithfully and without error that truth which God wanted put into sacred writings for the sake of salvation. Therefore, all Scripture is divinely inspired and has its use for teaching the truth and refuting error, for reformation of manners and discipline in right living, so that the man who belongs to God may be efficient and equipped for good work of every kind.
However, since God speaks in Sacred Scripture through men in human fashion, the interpreter of Sacred Scripture, in order to see clearly what God wanted to communicate to us, should carefully investigate what meaning the sacred writers really intended, and what God wanted to manifest by means of their words.
To search out the intention of the sacred writers, attention should be given, among other things, to ‘literary forms’. For the correct understanding of what the sacred author wanted to assert, due attention must be paid to the customary and characteristic styles of feeling, speaking and narrating which prevailed at the time of the sacred writer and to the patterns men normally employed at that period in their everyday dealings with one another.
But since Holy Scripture must be read and interpreted in the same spirit in which it was written, no less serious attention must be given to the content and unity of the whole of Scripture if the meaning of the sacred texts is to be correctly worked out. The living Tradition of the whole Church must be taken into account along with the harmony which exists between elements of the faith. It is the task of exegetes to work according to these rules toward a better understanding and explanation of the meaning of Sacred Scripture, so that through preparatory study the judgment of the Church may mature. For all of what has been said about the way of interpreting Scripture is subject finally to the judgment of the Church, which carries out the divine commission and ministry of guarding and interpreting the Word of God.
Second Vatican Council, Dei Verbum 11-12 (abridged).


Notes
On occasion comments on the readings may refer to some of these:
Celebrating the Saints, Celebrating the Seasons: ed. Robert Attwell, Canterbury Press
Celebrating Sundays: ed.Stephen Holmes, Canterbury Press
Breen: Reflections on the Readings for Every Day of the Church's Year, Patrick J. Breen O.Carm., Columba Press, 2011
Faley: Reflections on the Weekday lectionary Readings, Roland J. Faley, Paulist Press 2010
Fernandez: In Conversation With God: Meditations for each day of the year, Francis Fernandez, Scepter 2010 (8 vols)
Johnson: Benedictine Daily Prayer, ed. Maxwell E. Johnson, the Columba Press, 2005
King: The New Testament: A Fresh Translation, Nicholas King, Kevin Mayhew 2003
Magnificat, monthly publication with daily readings, a short form of Morning and Evening Prayer and meditations on art and culture and a daily reading from outside Scripture; subscriptions available here.
Marivoet: Liturgy Alive: Models of Celebration Weekdays; Redemptorist/Claretian 2003
Rotelle: Augustine on the Sunday Gospel, Hohn E. Rotelle OSA, Augustinian Press 1998

The Additional Office Lectionary
The two year cycle for the Office of Readings designed to accompany the Daily Eucharistic Lectionary; printed in the back of the CTS New Catholic Bible; RSV text readings available here.

Patristic Lectionary
From Pluscarden Abbey, based on A Word in Season, Augustinian Press; available here, and in the Lectionary folder of Company of Voices Resources.

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