Church of England Daily Prayer - Contemporay - Combined Prayer

Trinity Daily Prayer

A simple Liturgy of the Hours for singing available here.
Resources for the Liturgy stored at: Company of Voices Resources.

Saturday, 29 September 2012

Migrating to WordPress

Please note that as of now I am running this blog on Wordpress rather than Blogger, mainly to make updates etc possible from my iPad.

Please keep following and linking!

Very easy to find us here.

Role-models and School Hymns


When I was at school (Moulton Comprehensive)  Praise my soul the king of heaven was the school hymn. The headmaster, Mr Scott, would walk around the school and recite a line of the hymn and we would have to recite the following line - he did the same thing with the school poem, Kipling's 'If'. I got to know Mr Scott rather well because having come into one of my lessons and noticing my appalling handwriting he insisted for two years that I show him my homework every morning and teachers were not to mark it until he had signed it in his familiar green ink. It was a rather special relationship, he was ex-military and unlike me in many ways but I admired him greatly and he is undoubtedly one of my role models in headship. The important thing is that I really believed he knew me, I aspire to this as a headteacher for my pupils.  I'll perhaps say more about him and other important influences on me another time.
Well, we don' have a school hymn at Trinity yet. The houses are named after the three well known Archangels and Zadkiel, the Hebrew means righteousness or justice of God. 

I have started a verse for Zadkiel below. The rest of the text is by Aelred-Seton Shanley Obl.OSB Cam.
He died some years ago, so if anyone can help .....
(I think there might be a school competition in this).

This is what Wikipedia has on Zadkiel:


"Zadkiel or Hesediel (Heb. צדקיאל Tzadqiel, "Righteousness of God") is the archangel of freedom, benevolence, mercy, and the Patron Angel of all who forgive. Also known as Sachiel, Zedekiel, Zadakiel, Tzadkiel, Zedekul and Hesediel. Rabbinical tradition considers him to be the angel of mercy.
 Zadkiel was said to be the Angel who prevented Abraham from sacrificing his son, Isaac.
In rabbinic writings Zadkiel belongs to the order of Hashmallim (equated with the Dominations or Dominions), and considered by some sources to be chief of that order (others sources name Hashmal or Zacharael). InMaseket Azilut Zadkiel/Hesediel is listed as co-chief with Gabriel of the order of Shinanim. As an angel of mercy, some texts claim that Zadkiel is the unnamed Biblical Angel of the Lord who holds back Abraham to prevent the patriarch from sacrificing his son, and because of this is usually shown holding a dagger. Other texts cite Michael or Tadhiel or some other angel as the angel intended, while others interpret the Angel of the Lord as a theophany.
Zadkiel is one of two standard bearers (along with Jophiel) who follow directly behind Michael as the head archangel enters battle. Zadkiel is associated with the color violet.
 Zadkiel or Hesediel (Heb. צדקיאל Tzadqiel, "Righteousness of God") is the archangel of freedom, benevolence, mercy, and the Patron Angel of all who forgive. Also known as Sachiel, Zedekiel, Zadakiel, Tzadkiel, Zedekul and Hesediel. Rabbinical tradition considers him to be the angel of mercy.
 Zadkiel was said to be the Angel who prevented Abraham from sacrificing his son, Isaac.
In rabbinic writings Zadkiel belongs to the order of Hashmallim (equated with the Dominations or Dominions), and considered by some sources to be chief of that order (others sources name Hashmal or Zacharael). InMaseket Azilut Zadkiel/Hesediel is listed as co-chief with Gabriel of the order of Shinanim. As an angel of mercy, some texts claim that Zadkiel is the unnamed Biblical Angel of the Lord who holds back Abraham to prevent the patriarch from sacrificing his son, and because of this is usually shown holding a dagger. Other texts cite Michael or Tadhiel or some other angel as the angel intended, while others interpret the Angel of the Lord as a theophany.
Zadkiel is one of two standard bearers (along with Jophiel) who follow directly behind Michael as the head archangel enters battle. Zadkiel is associated with the color violet."


Works well to the tune usually sung with Praise my soul...

You who pierce the dazzling darkness,
clothed in light and robed in flame,
rad'iant in the Holy glory
of the One whom you proclaim:
ceaseless in your rounds of worship
of the awesome, nameless Name:

Michael, guard of heaven's threshold,
just defender at each death,
be the prosecutor's downfall
as you plead our second birth;
clothed in Christ - his light our armour,
pilot us to heaven's berth.

Gabriel, who bear God's greeting,
to all those who strain to hear;
your's the word that, borne in silence,
to the silent heart draws near:
fragrant burns the evening incense
in the temple you appear.

Raphael, who guided Tobit,
plying your physician's art:
be companion on our journey
pointing out where roads must part.
Lead us safely through life's dangers
to the stronghold of God's heart.

Zadkiel, God's call to justice,
challenging... ?????

Energies of blinding splendour
- vaster than the nebulae -
singing ceaselessly your 'sanctus'
through the flux of night and day:
school us now for that great glory
to which heav'n and earth give way.

Friday, 28 September 2012

The Diocese of Southwark: Bishop Christopher's call to mission: Faith, Hope, Love

The Diocese of Southwark of which I am privileged to be a priest is currently engaged in Bishop Christopher's Call to Mission: Faith, Hope and Love. It is refreshing that our bishop has chosen to encourage us to work with these fundamentals rather than with structural change, management systems or even a 'fresh expression' which, like the phrase 'motivational speaker' sends a chill up my spine. FHL is being used in a number of phases. One of the most important things for me as a diocesan Head teacher is that at every stage schools have been invited to and part of every element of FHL. This reflects Bishop Christopher's commitment to schools as 'at the heart of the church's mission to the nation' and the very real commitment of time he gives to schools - it is the first diocese I have served in where every child in our school would not only be able to name the diocesan bishop but where he could name and recognise numbers of children. 
Lest I be suspected of seeking promotion (which I am not) I had better confess that we haven't so far made a great deal of the FHL material at Trinity - because we had a significant number of staff new to the school in September and we needed to provide appropriate induction for them. However, the senior staff and I had a quiet day at the monastery at Crawley Down at the very beginning of term and we recognised that the next phase of the school's life was very much about deepening the school's life and really embedding the many changes made over the last few years. We have talked about this as becoming 'more contemplative', and in particular my moving to a more contemplative and less operational role in the school's life, thinking of my role as Executive Head not just strategically, but as resident storyteller and theologian. 
At half term I am going to make my annual retreat (in one of the hermitages at Crawley Down). As the root text of that retreat I intend to use the prayer provided by the diocese for the Faith, Hope, Love call to mission. I don't know who wrote it but I think it works well:

God of faith, deepen our faith
so we may bear witness to Christ in the world;

God of hope, strengthen our hope 

so we may be signposts to your transforming presence;

God of love, kindle our love

so that in a fragile and divided world,
we may be signs of the faith, hope, love
which we share in Jesus Christ.

Starting at the end this is clearly a Jesus centred prayer. It is Jesus who is the source of our faith, hope and love; it is participating in his life that we share them, not as individuals but in common (in communion) with others. Working backwards, the prayer acknowledges the reality of our world as fragile and divided. 'Fragile' is a good word because what is fragile can so often be precious and beautiful, as our world is, but is always in danger of being damaged or broken. 
I particularly like the use of nouns and verbs in the text:

Nouns         Verbs
Faith            deepen
Hope           strengthen
Love            kindle

I have tried to think of a way of making a short chant of this combination of verbs and nouns:

I'd gladly receive any suggestions for reading around these ideas as I prepare for my retreat. I hope that it will bear fruit for the school in enabling us to engage more deeply with this after half term when we launch FHL substantially to children through handing out the FHL wrist bands and using material provided in staff meetings and tutor times.

  

Additional Prayers for the Priest at the Eucharist

Msgr Andrew Burnham, until recently a bishop in the Church of England and now a priest in the Ordinariate has written about the tendency of Anglo-Catholics to maximise the liturgy as one of the gifts of the Ordinariate to the Roman Catholic church. Anglo-Catholics have been enriching the church's official texts ever since John Cosin's Hours of Prayer, and possibly and probably since the separation from Rome. Of course, this practice really took off with the ritualists of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. With Rome using Latin for its liturgy even those who adopted wholesale the Roman Missal in English translation were recognisably Anglican by virtue of use of the Authorised Version and Prayer Book texts. The exception, I suppose being, the few Benedictine communities (Nashdom, West Malling and Ealing) that used Latin throughout their liturgy.
Since Vatican 2 the more Anglo-papalist have adopted the Roman Missal and Divine Office, while others used the ASB and Common Worship whenever possible.
I have always enriched the official provision with texts from the Roman Missal, notably Prayers over the Gifts, prefaces etc. And like many people use the priest's private prayers from the Missal.
I have compiled a set of additional prayers which we use here at Trinity, based on the new edition of the Missal. I post the full text below and it may also be found as a Word document in Company of Voices Resources (Enriching the Eucharist).
As well as texts from the Missal, I have added the seasonal introductions to the Lord's Prayer from Common Worship Daily Prayer. The new translation of the introduction from the Missal is a very simple and fine text with real poetry and works well for ordinary time. I have grown tired of some of the ones I have used in the past 'Jesus taught us to call God our Father and so we pray' or 'Let us pray for the coming of the kingdom as Jesus taught us'. I suspect, but only time will tell if this new form will wear better.
Most of the other texts are uncontroversial, I am happy to stick with official versions where provided as in the berakah prayers over the gifts even in their Common Worship form. After all 'set before you' means simply to 'offer' anyway!
The sets of intercessions for insertion into the Eucharistic Prayers are, of course, not necessary when intercessions are prayed separately in the usual position. Although whenever I am presiding if the bishop of the diocese has not been prayed for by name I add this to the Eucharistic Prayers as a reminder to myself that I do not celebrate the Mass on my own behalf but in communion with the local Bishop. However, in school time is always precious and the early, 7:30 Mass has to last no more than 15 minutes and we aim for the Whole School Masses to be no more than 35-45 minutes including 600 communions or blessings! So we do not have separate intercessions. Normally Fr Mike our chaplain or a visiting priest presides and I concelebrate, and pray the intercessions extempore. The additions to Eucharistic Prayer C - my favourite - reflect the 1549 text ad add some additional imagery. I have taken to using this prayer with proper, extended prefaces, which is against the rubrics, but works well.

I should stress, I suppose, that one of the many places, no doubt, where Msgr. Burnham and I would part company is in the maximilism demanded by the Romans in questions of validity and such like, or at least in the definitions of them. A little like the discussion on this blog about the Assumption many Anglicans have clearly believed for a very long time that Mary is with Jesus. bodily in heaven, the how being somewhat less relevant. So in no way do I think our Anglican rites are deficient or imagine that any of the additions that I use add anything by way of validity. They are, I think, words which enhance the beauty of our worship and our recognition of the divine presence in it. The Roman forms have no more authority for me than their venerable usage. I willingly and happily use Methodist, Baptist and URC forms when appropriate and allowed by canon. I think a minimalist approach to doctrine, saying only that which is needed to be said, and in many other areas of church life, is much to be encouraged.
I would be interested to know what other people use. I'd also be interested to know what translations people are using of the vesting prayers. The one on the ACS cards include the phrase 'make me white O Lord' which in a majority black context such as Trinity always feel uncomfortable even though it's only me praying it secretly.

Celebrating the Eucharist
Before the Gospel. And after the Alleluia verse, the Priest, bowing before the altar, says quietly:
Cleanse my heart and my lips, almighty God, that I may worthily proclaim your holy Gospel.

At the end of the Gospel, after the people’s response the Priest kisses the book, saying quietly:
Through the words of the Gospel may our sins be wiped out.

At the pouring of a little water into the chalice:
By the mystery of this water and wine may we come to share in the divinity of Christ who humbled himself to share in our humanity.

After the prayer over the chalice the Priest, bowing profoundly, says:
With humble spirit and contrite heart may we be accepted by you, O Lord, and may our sacrifice in your sight this day be pleasing to you, Lord God.

After the incensing, the Priest, standing at the side of the altar, washes his or hands, saying quietly:
Wash, me O Lord, from my iniquity and cleanse me from my sin.

If not used publicly the Priest may say quietly on returning to the altar:
May the Lord accept the sacrifice at my hands for the praise and glory of his name, for our good and the good of all his holy church.

Common Worship Eucharistic Prayer C
Paragraph before the doxology:
Grant that by his merits and death,
and through faith in his blood,
together with N our bishop, N and N his assistants,
N our Archbishop, all the bishops and their clergy
we and all your Church may receive forgiveness of our sins
and all other benefits of his passion.
Although we are unworthy, [striking the breast] through our manifold sins,
to offer you any sacrifice,
yet we pray that you will accept this
the duty and service that we owe.
Command these our prayers and supplications, by the ministry of your holy angels,
to be brought into your holy Tabernacle before the sight of your divine majesty.
Do not weigh our merits, but pardon our offences,
and fill us all who share in this holy communion
in the company of the Blessed Virgin Mary,
[Saint N our patron, Saint N (and N) whose memory we celebrate today]
and all the saints
(making the sign of the cross) with your grace and heavenly blessing.

Common Worship Eucharistic Prayer B (before the epiclesis over the people)
and E (after the paragraph that follows the memorial acclamation):
May this Sacrifice of our reconciliation we pray, O Lord,
advance the peace and salvation of all the world.
Be pleased to confirm in faith and charity your pilgrim Church on earth,
with your servant N our bishop (N and N his assistants),
and the leaders and pastors of all the churches.
Remember in kindness people of all faiths and none,
that the whole human family may live together in peace and harmony.
Remember Elizabeth our Queen and the leaders of the nations,
grant peace and prosperity to all, the protection of our planet,
and an end to violence and war.
Remember this school and all our work,
each child and their family, all who teach and all who learn.
Remember [N and N and] all who have asked our prayers,
those who have no one to pray for them by name and those whose needs are hidden.

Remember [N and N] and all who have gone before us,
welcome them into the light of your face
and grant us, with them, a place of refreshment, light and peace.

In Masses for the dead:
Remember your servant N whom you have called (today)
from this world to yourself.
Grant that he/she who was united with your Son in a death like his,
may also be one with him in his Resurrection,
when from the earth
he will raise up in the flesh those who have died,
and transform our lowly body
after the pattern of his own glorious body.
to our departed brothers and sisters, too,
and to all who were pleasing to you
at their passing from this life,
give kind admittance to your kingdom.
There we hope to enjoy for ever the fullness of your glory,
when you will wipe await every tear from our eyes.
For seeing you, our God, as you are,
we shall be like you for all the ages
and praise you without end.

Introduction to the Lord’s Prayer:
At the Saviour’s command and formed by divine teaching, we dare to say:

Advent
Awaiting his coming in glory, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Christmas
Rejoicing in the presence of God here among us, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Epiphany
Believing the promises of God, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Lent
Trusting in the compassion of God, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Eastertime
Rejoicing in God's new creation, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Ascension
Looking for the coming of the Kingdom, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Pentecost
Being made one by the power of the Spirit, as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

All Saints to Advent and Any Saints' day
Uniting our prayer (with N and) the whole company of heaven,
as our Saviour... / let us pray with confidence as ...

Between the Lord’s Prayer and the doxology or after the Lord’s Prayer:
Deliver us, Lord, we pray, from every evil, graciously grant peace in our days, that by the help of your mercy, we may be always free from sin and safe from all distress, as we await the blessed hope and the coming of our Saviour, Jesus Christ.

Common Worship permits the Peace to be used just before the Fraction:
Lord Jesus Christ, who said to your Apostles:
Peace I leave you, my peace I give you, look not on our sins, but on the faith of your Church,
and graciously grant her peace and unity in accordance with your will.
The peace of the Lord be always with you:
And also with you.

Taking the host, breaking it over the Paten, the Priest places a small piece in the chalice saying quietly:
May this mingling of the Body and Blood of our Lord Jesus Christ bring eternal life to us who receive it.

Before, during or after the Agnus Dei (whichever is most convenient), the Priest prays quietly:
Lord Jesus Christ, Son of the Living God, who by the will of the Father and the work of the Holy Spirit, through your Death gave life to the world, free me from this, your most holy Body and Blood, from all my sins and from every evil; keep me always faithful to your commandments, and never let me be parted from you.

Or:
May the receiving of your Body and Blood, Lord Jesus Christ, not bring me to judgement and condemnation, but through your loving mercy be for me protection in mind and body and a healing remedy.

Or:
We do not presume to come to this thy Table, O merciful Lord, trusting in our own righteousness, but in thy manifold and great mercies. We are not worthy so much as to gather up the crumbs under thy Table. But thou art the same Lord, whose property is always to have mercy: Grant us therefore, gracious Lord, so to eat the flesh of thy dear Son Jesus Christ, and to drink his blood, that our sinful bodies may be made clean by his body, and our souls washed through his most precious blood, and that we may evermore dwell in him, and he in us. Amen

Or:
Most merciful Lord, your love compels us to come in. Our hands were unclean, our hearts were unprepared; we were not fit even to eat the crumbs from under your table. But you, Lord, are the God of our salvation, and share your bread with sinners. So cleanse and feed us with the precious body and blood of your Son, that he may live in us and we in him; and that we, with the whole company of Christ, may sit and eat in your kingdom. Amen.

The Priest, facing the altar, says quietly:
May the Body of Christ keep me safe for eternal life.
And he or she reverently consumes the Body of Christ.

Then he or she takes the chalice and says quietly:
May the Blood of Christ keep me safe for eternal life.
And he or she reverently consumes the Blood of Christ.

While he or she carries out the purification, the Priest says quietly:
What has passed our lips as food, O Lord, may we possess in purity of heart, that what has been given to us in time may be our healing for eternity.

Book review: Glenstal Sunday Missal

The monks of Glenstal Abbey in the Republic of Ireland have a fine tradition of publishing. On this blog I have mentioned Readings for the Seasons previously. Their Glenstal Book of Prayer and Glenstal Book of Icons are also excellent.
This hand Missal for Sundays and festivals (successor to the Glenstal Bible Missal) is quite simple. For every Mass of the three year cycle and the principal feasts (the holy days of obligation) the full text of the Mass and readings is provided using the Jerusalem Bible and the new translation of the Roman Missal. The additional features are short, one paragraph introductions to each reading. they are well written, factual, often summarising the reading but also providing additional context and teaching. Sometimes very short they provoke important thinking.On the feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica the reading from Ezekiel is introduced in this rather profound way:
"We are becoming increasingly aware that the word 'Church' covers a mystery with many layers of meaning. One such basic layer is the Church as the temple of God from which a life-giving torrent pours forth incessantly."For each set of readings there are also verse references for 'Impulses for prayer' single verses or short passages extracted from the readings. Since the verse numbers are not given in the text a Bible would be needed to use them.
The most interesting feature are the 'Meditations' provided for each set of readings. These are short passages from Christian authors which further elucidate or enlighten the reader. they are selected from a good ecumenical group of writers including Esther de Waal, John Macquarrie, R.S. Thomas and Carol Ann Duffy. I shall certainly be referencing these for the notes on this blog. There is a definite monastic, well chewed quality to the variety of sources and texts chosen. If you are seeking a Sunday Missal and want something extra this is definitely worth buying. I am not sure what versions are available, the one I bought is green with gold lettering, gold edges to pages and a helpful five ribbon markers. The pages are well laid out with rubrics in red. There are no clip art or other illustrations and no additional prayers or texts other than those referred to.
For those of us who use the Revised Common Lectionary, especially in its Common Worship form (which is a very good improvement of the original Roman version) there are several occasions a year when a resource such as this Missal will not match our readings; but in fact these are relatively few and I would thoroughly recommend the Glenstal Sunday Missal.

Readings Saturday 29th September

Saints Michael, Gabriel and Raphael, Archangels
 
Daily Eucharistic Lectionary
These notes assume that the Daily Eucharistic Lectionary is used alongside the two year additional Office lectionary (for the Office of Readings) to provide three readings a day for use at Eucharist and Office.

Short text for the day:
Do not fear, greatly beloved, you are safe.
Daily Reflections from Creighton University for today here.
Liturgy Alive prayers and readings here.

First Reading
Genesis 28:10-17 Roman Rite Daniel 7:9-10


Jacob left Beer-sheba and went towards Haran. 11He came to a certain place and stayed there for the night, because the sun had set. Taking one of the stones of the place, he put it under his head and lay down in that place. 12And he dreamed that there was a ladder* set up on the earth, the top of it reaching to heaven; and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. 13And the Lord stood beside him* and said, ‘I am the Lord, the God of Abraham your father and the God of Isaac; the land on which you lie I will give to you and to your offspring; 14and your offspring shall be like the dust of the earth, and you shall spread abroad to the west and to the east and to the north and to the south; and all the families of the earth shall be blessed* in you and in your offspring. 15Know that I am with you and will keep you wherever you go, and will bring you back to this land; for I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you.’ 16Then Jacob woke from his sleep and said, ‘Surely the Lord is in this place—and I did not know it!’ 17And he was afraid, and said, ‘How awesome is this place! This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.’
Psalm 103  Roman Rite 138

Second Reading
Rev 12: 7-12

And war broke out in heaven; Michael and his angels fought against the dragon. The dragon and his angels fought back, 8but they were defeated, and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. 9The great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.
10 Then I heard a loud voice in heaven, proclaiming,
‘Now have come the salvation and the power
and the kingdom of our God
and the authority of his Messiah,*
for the accuser of our comrades* has been thrown down,
who accuses them day and night before our God.
11 But they have conquered him by the blood of the Lamb
and by the word of their testimony,
for they did not cling to life even in the face of death.
12 Rejoice then, you heavens
and those who dwell in them!
But woe to the earth and the sea,
for the devil has come down to you
with great wrath,
because he knows that his time is short!’
Gospel
John 1: 47-51
47When Jesus saw Nathanael coming towards him, he said of him, ‘Here is truly an Israelite in whom there is no deceit!’ 48Nathanael asked him, ‘Where did you come to know me?’ Jesus answered, ‘I saw you under the fig tree before Philip called you.’ 49Nathanael replied, ‘Rabbi, you are the Son of God! You are the King of Israel!’ 50Jesus answered, ‘Do you believe because I told you that I saw you under the fig tree? You will see greater things than these.’ 51And he said to him, ‘Very truly, I tell you, you will see heaven opened and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son of Man.’


 
Additional Office Lectionary
The Office of Readings lection is Revelations 12:1-17 which includes the Mass reading for today so from the Common Worship lectionary:

Daniel 10: 4-end
At that time I, Daniel, had been mourning for three weeks. 3I had eaten no rich food, no meat or wine had entered my mouth, and I had not anointed myself at all, for the full three weeks. 4On the twenty-fourth day of the first month, as I was standing on the bank of the great river (that is, the Tigris), 5I looked up and saw a man clothed in linen, with a belt of gold from Uphaz around his waist. 6His body was like beryl, his face like lightning, his eyes like flaming torches, his arms and legs like the gleam of burnished bronze, and the sound of his words like the roar of a multitude. 7I, Daniel, alone saw the vision; the people who were with me did not see the vision, though a great trembling fell upon them, and they fled and hid themselves. 8So I was left alone to see this great vision. My strength left me, and my complexion grew deathly pale, and I retained no strength. 9Then I heard the sound of his words; and when I heard the sound of his words, I fell into a trance, face to the ground.

10 But then a hand touched me and roused me to my hands and knees. 11He said to me, ‘Daniel, greatly beloved, pay attention to the words that I am going to speak to you. Stand on your feet, for I have now been sent to you.’ So while he was speaking this word to me, I stood up trembling. 12He said to me, ‘Do not fear, Daniel, for from the first day that you set your mind to gain understanding and to humble yourself before your God, your words have been heard, and I have come because of your words. 13But the prince of the kingdom of Persia opposed me for twenty-one days. So Michael, one of the chief princes, came to help me, and I left him there with the prince of the kingdom of Persia,* 14and have come to help you understand what is to happen to your people at the end of days. For there is a further vision for those days.’
15 While he was speaking these words to me, I turned my face towards the ground and was speechless. 16Then one in human form touched my lips, and I opened my mouth to speak, and said to the one who stood before me, ‘My lord, because of the vision such pains have come upon me that I retain no strength. 17How can my lord’s servant talk with my lord? For I am shaking,* no strength remains in me, and no breath is left in me.’
18 Again one in human form touched me and strengthened me. 19He said, ‘Do not fear, greatly beloved, you are safe. Be strong and courageous!’ When he spoke to me, I was strengthened and said, ‘Let my lord speak, for you have strengthened me.’ 20Then he said, ‘Do you know why I have come to you? Now I must return to fight against the prince of Persia, and when I am through with him, the prince of Greece will come. 21But I am to tell you what is inscribed in the book of truth. There is no one with me who contends against these princes except Michael, your prince.

New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Readings will be removed each week.

Non Scriptural Reading
Celebrating Seasons provides three readings, the third is an ancient Celtic poem which is rather interesting - I mark the book up as Years A/B/C and using them in the years of the lectionary cycle.
Here's the reading from benedictine Daily Prayer:

from Angels: Spirits, Magnificent and Mighty by Athanasius Recheis:
The angels of revelation are not demigods, like the angels of pagan religions, but servants of the one true God. There may be similarities too, and direct influences from, other religions, but this in no way argues against taking the biblical teaching of angels with all seriousness.
True biblical belief in angels can be no hindrance in our journey to God, it can only be  a help. belief in angels makes us more aware of God's providential love, of God's greatness and glory. Never does an angel intrude between God and us. Angels are completely devoted to god, completely amenable to the divine holy will. they never act on their own, never transgress the limits of their instructions from on high. All their activity is found in the performance of divine commands. When they speak, their words ask faith in God and obedience to god. And when we are moved to thank them, they point us to God and say; Worship God! So spoke the archangel Raphael to Tobias when the latter sought to thank him for his kind assistance, for the archangel said; Praise god, and give God thanks in the presence of all the living.
the Bible portrays angels in a twofold function: they stand before God, singing God's praises; and they are sent into the world, especially to certain individuals, as messengers and executors of God's decrees. Many pages of the Bible testify to the ministerial role of angels in the long preparation of human redemption. They were created through the Son of god - through him, in him, and for him. though created good, some of them rebelled against god and are condemned to eternal punishment. their activity reveals them as immaterial beings, powerful and magnificent. In the scale of life they are closer to god than humans, transecnding the material universe. three of them, of highest excellence, the Bible mentions by name: Michael, Gabriel and Raphael.
Divine revelation presents angels as beings endowed with unique personalities but completely subservient to god and to the missions assigned to them. Angels are created reflections of the triume God. they mirror, as far as creatures can, God's love, God's might, God's life. they are the hands which God extends to uphold us, the wings God spreads to shield us.

Notes

On occasion comments on the readings may refer to some of these:
Celebrating the Saints, Celebrating the Seasons: ed. Robert Attwell, Canterbury Press
Celebrating Sundays: ed.Stephen Holmes, Canterbury Press
Breen: Reflections on the Readings for Every Day of the Church's Year, Patrick J. Breen O.Carm., Columba Press, 2011
Faley: Reflections on the Weekday lectionary Readings, Roland J. Faley, Paulist Press 2010
Fernandez: In Conversation With God: Meditations for each day of the year, Francis Fernandez, Scepter 2010 (8 vols)
Johnson: Benedictine Daily Prayer, ed. Maxwell E. Johnson, the Columba Press, 2005
King: The New Testament: A Fresh Translation, Nicholas King, Kevin Mayhew 2003
Magnificat, monthly publication with daily readings, a short form of Morning and Evening Prayer and meditations on art and culture and a daily reading from outside Scripture; subscriptions available here.
Marivoet: Liturgy Alive: Models of Celebration Weekdays; Redemptorist/Claretian 2003Rotelle: Augustine on the Sunday Gospel, Hohn E. Rotelle OSA, Augustinian Press 1998
The Additional Office Lectionary The two year cycle for the Office of Readings designed to accompany the Daily Eucharistic Lectionary; printed in the back of the CTS New Catholic Bible; RSV text readings available here.
Patristic Lectionary
From Pluscarden Abbey, edited by Fr Stephen Mark Holmes, based on A Word in Season, Augustinian Press; available here, and in the Lectionary folder of Company of Voices Resources.

Thursday, 27 September 2012

Readings Friday 28th September

Trinity 16
Friday of the 25th Week of the Year

Ember Day

Additional commemorations:
Wenceslas
The Bose Community observe today as one of the 'righteous among the nations' the Chinese philosopher known to the West as Confucius:

(551-479 BCE)
In 479 Kong Qiu Zhongni, better known in the West by his latinized name Confucius ("the master of the Kong family"), died in what is now the city of Qufu, China.
Confucius was born in China's Lu state into a family of high dignitaries. At the age of seventeen he became an officer in the Chinese mandarinate. He dedicated his life to fighting the spread of corruption and reforming the administration of public property according to the criteria of justice and order, which he considered to be qualities found in nature.
In his life and in his public discourses, Confucius called for social renewal beginning with the inner renewal of each person, which becomes possible when people combat all of the idols that distance them from the love of integrity and from harmony with one another.
Confucius believed in the gods of his ancestors, but unlike Lao-Tze, he did not invoke religion to support his work as a reformer. Instead, he relied on common sense and his understanding of human nature.
His teaching had an enormous impact on Chinese culture, and remains one of the cornerstones of the world's most populous civilization. Confucius' message of peace, harmony and justice in the cosmos, to which he gave unceasing witness throughout his life, makes him one of the righteous among the nations.


Daily Eucharistic Lectionary
These notes assume that the Daily Eucharistic Lectionary is used alongside the two year additional Office lectionary (for the Office of Readings) to provide three readings a day for use at Eucharist and Office.

Short text for the day:

‘But who do you say that I am?’ 

Daily Reflections from Creighton University for today here.
Liturgy Alive prayers and readings here.


Opening Prayer from Liturgy Alive:

God, in your wisdom
you order the course of time
and you lead the world and people
to their destiny in you.
You do all things well.
Make us see with eyes of faith
the opportunities you give us every moment.
Help us to use our time and life
and all your good gifts
to build up your kingdom stone by stone,
until you complete it in your own good time
through Jesus Christ, our Lord.

First Reading
Ecclesiastes 3:1-11


3For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven:
2 a time to be born, and a time to die;
a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted;
3 a time to kill, and a time to heal;
a time to break down, and a time to build up;
4 a time to weep, and a time to laugh;
a time to mourn, and a time to dance;
5 a time to throw away stones, and a time to gather stones together;
a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
6 a time to seek, and a time to lose;
a time to keep, and a time to throw away;
7 a time to tear, and a time to sew;
a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;
8 a time to love, and a time to hate;
a time for war, and a time for peace.
9 What gain have the workers from their toil? 10I have seen the business that God has given to everyone to be busy with. 11He has made everything suitable for its time; moreover, he has put a sense of past and future into their minds, yet they cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end.

Psalm 144

Gospel

Luke 9:18-22

18 Once when Jesus was praying alone, with only the disciples near him, he asked them, ‘Who do the crowds say that I am?’ 19They answered, ‘John the Baptist; but others, Elijah; and still others, that one of the ancient prophets has arisen.’ 20He said to them, ‘But who do you say that I am?’ Peter answered, ‘The Messiah of God.’
21 He sternly ordered and commanded them not to tell anyone, 22saying, ‘The Son of Man must undergo great suffering, and be rejected by the elders, chief priests, and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.’

Additional Office Lectionary
Tobit 7:1,8-17; 8:4-16


Tobit 7:1- 8:16
7Now when they entered Ecbatana, Tobias said to him, ‘Brother Azariah, take me straight to our brother Raguel.’ So he took him to Raguel’s house, where they found him sitting beside the courtyard door. They greeted him first, and he replied, ‘Joyous greetings, brothers; welcome and good health!’ Then he brought them into his house. [2He said to his wife Edna, ‘How much the young man resembles my kinsman Tobit!’ 3Then Edna questioned them, saying, ‘Where are you from, brothers?’ They answered, ‘We belong to the descendants of Naphtali who are exiles in Nineveh.’ 4She said to them, ‘Do you know our kinsman Tobit?’ And they replied, ‘Yes, we know him.’ Then she asked them, ‘Is he in good health?’ 5They replied, ‘He is alive and in good health.’ And Tobias added, ‘He is my father!’ 6At that Raguel jumped up and kissed him and wept. 7He also spoke to him as follows, ‘Blessings on you, my child, son of a good and noble father! O most miserable of calamities that such an upright and beneficent man has become blind!’ He then embraced his kinsman Tobias and wept.] 8His wife Edna also wept for him, and their daughter Sarah likewise wept. 9Then Raguel slaughtered a ram from the flock and received them very warmly.
When they had bathed and washed themselves and had reclined to dine, Tobias said to Raphael, ‘Brother Azariah, ask Raguel to give me my kinswoman Sarah.’ 10But Raguel overheard it and said to the lad, ‘Eat and drink, and be merry tonight. For no one except you, brother, has the right to marry my daughter Sarah. Likewise I am not at liberty to give her to any other man than yourself, because you are my nearest relative. But let me explain to you the true situation more fully, my child. 11I have given her to seven men of our kinsmen, and all died on the night when they went in to her. But now, my child, eat and drink, and the Lord will act on behalf of you both.’ But Tobias said, ‘I will neither eat nor drink anything until you settle the things that pertain to me.’ So Raguel said, ‘I will do so. She is given to you in accordance with the decree in the book of Moses, and it has been decreed from heaven that she should be given to you. Take your kinswoman; from now on you are her brother and she is your sister. She is given to you from today and for ever. May the Lord of heaven, my child, guide and prosper you both this night and grant you mercy and peace.’ 12Then Raguel summoned his daughter Sarah. When she came to him he took her by the hand and gave her to Tobias, saying, ‘Take her to be your wife in accordance with the law and decree written in the book of Moses. Take her and bring her safely to your father. And may the God of heaven prosper your journey with his peace.’ 13Then he called her mother and told her to bring writing material; and he wrote out a copy of a marriage contract, to the effect that he gave her to him as wife according to the decree of the law of Moses. 14Then they began to eat and drink.
 15 Raguel called his wife Edna and said to her, ‘Sister, get the other room ready, and take her there.’ 16So she went and made the bed in the room as he had told her, and brought Sarah there. She wept for her daughter. Then, wiping away the tears, she said to her, ‘Take courage, my daughter; the Lord of heaven grant you joy in place of your sorrow. Take courage, my daughter.’ Then she went out.
 8When they had finished eating and drinking they wanted to retire; so they took the young man and brought him into the bedroom. 2Then Tobias remembered the words of Raphael, and he took the fish’s liver and heart out of the bag where he had them and put them on the embers of the incense. 3The odour of the fish so repelled the demon that he fled to the remotest parts of Egypt. But Raphael followed him, and at once bound him there hand and foot.
4 When the parents had gone out and shut the door of the room, Tobias got out of bed and said to Sarah, ‘Sister, get up, and let us pray and implore our Lord that he grant us mercy and safety.’ 5So she got up, and they began to pray and implore that they might be kept safe. Tobias began by saying,
‘Blessed are you, O God of our ancestors,
   and blessed is your name in all generations for ever.
Let the heavens and the whole creation bless you for ever.
6 You made Adam, and for him you made his wife Eve
   as a helper and support.
   From the two of them the human race has sprung.
You said, “It is not good that the man should be alone;
   let us make a helper for him like himself.”
7 I now am taking this kinswoman of mine,
   not because of lust,
   but with sincerity.
Grant that she and I may find mercy
   and that we may grow old together.’
8And they both said, ‘Amen, Amen.’ 9Then they went to sleep for the night.
 But Raguel arose and called his servants to him, and they went and dug a grave, 10for he said, ‘It is possible that he will die and we will become an object of ridicule and derision.’ 11When they had finished digging the grave, Raguel went into his house and called his wife, 12saying, ‘Send one of the maids and have her go in to see if he is alive. But if he is dead, let us bury him without anyone knowing it.’ 13So they sent the maid, lit a lamp, and opened the door; and she went in and found them sound asleep together. 14Then the maid came out and informed them that he was alive and that nothing was wrong. 15So they blessed the God of heaven, and Raguel said,
‘Blessed are you, O God, with every pure blessing;
   let all your chosen ones bless you.
   Let them bless you for ever.
16 Blessed are you because you have made me glad.
   It has not turned out as I expected,
   but you have dealt with us according to your great mercy.

New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Readings will be removed each week.

Non Scriptural Reading

A READING FROM A SERMON BY ST BEDE
The fact that our Lord and Saviour when invited to a wedding reception not only agreed to attend it but also condescended to work a miracle at it in order to give pleasure to the assembled guests confirms the faith of any genuine believer even if understood in its literal sense alone, and without searching it for deeper spiritual meanings.
But perhaps we may experience a more sublime joy from contemplating the deeper spiritual meaning of this event. It was as he was about to begin his miracle-working on earth that the Son of God attended a wedding, to make it clear to all that it was really he whom the psalmist had symbolised in the Sun, of which he sang: He came out like a bridegroom from his bridal chamber, exulting like a strong man to run his course; his rising is at one end of the heavens, and his course takes him to the other end.
Somewhere in the gospel Christ says of himself and his disciples, Can the wedding guests be sad while the bridegroom is with them? A time will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast.
Now from the moment our Saviour’s incarnation was first promised to the patriarchs, its realisation was awaited with sighs and tears by generation after generation of holy people. In much the same way, ever since his ascension to heaven after his resurrection all the hopes of the faithful have been centred on him in return. It was only during the short period of his sojourn among men that they were excepted from the need to weep and mourn, for then they had him among them also in the flesh whom they loved spiritually. Christ, then, is the bridegroom and the Church his bride; the wedding guests are the individual believers. The wed­ding celebrations celebrate the time when Christ united the holy Church to himself through the mystery of the Incarnation.
So it was not by chance but in order to reveal a definite mystery that the Lord came to that wedding breakfast. It was held to celebrate the physical union of a couple in everyday life on earth; but Christ had come down from heaven to earth to join his Church to himself in a bond of spiritual love. His bridal chamber was the womb of his Virgin Mother, in which our human nature was wedded to its God, and from which he came out like a bridegroom to unite with himself his Church. It was in Judea that this wedding first took place, for it was there that the Son of God assumed human nature, and later deigned to hallow the Church by allowing it to partake of his body, and where too he graciously confirmed it in faith by the pledge of his Spirit; but after he had called all nations to embrace that faith, the rejoicing attendant on his wedding celebrations spread abroad to every corner of the globe.
St Bede, Homily 14 (CCL 122:95-96); Word in Season VIII.

Notes
On occasion comments on the readings may refer to some of these:
Celebrating the Saints, Celebrating the Seasons: ed. Robert Attwell, Canterbury Press
Celebrating Sundays: ed.Stephen Holmes, Canterbury Press
Breen: Reflections on the Readings for Every Day of the Church's Year, Patrick J. Breen O.Carm., Columba Press, 2011
Faley: Reflections on the Weekday lectionary Readings, Roland J. Faley, Paulist Press 2010
Fernandez: In Conversation With God: Meditations for each day of the year, Francis Fernandez, Scepter 2010 (8 vols)
Johnson: Benedictine Daily Prayer, ed. Maxwell E. Johnson, the Columba Press, 2005
King: The New Testament: A Fresh Translation, Nicholas King, Kevin Mayhew 2003
Magnificat, monthly publication with daily readings, a short form of Morning and Evening Prayer and meditations on art and culture and a daily reading from outside Scripture; subscriptions available here.
Marivoet: Liturgy Alive: Models of Celebration Weekdays; Redemptorist/Claretian 2003Rotelle: Augustine on the Sunday Gospel, Hohn E. Rotelle OSA, Augustinian Press 1998
The Additional Office Lectionary The two year cycle for the Office of Readings designed to accompany the Daily Eucharistic Lectionary; printed in the back of the CTS New Catholic Bible; RSV text readings available here.
Patristic Lectionary
From Pluscarden Abbey, edited by Fr Stephen Mark Holmes, based on A Word in Season, Augustinian Press; available here, and in the Lectionary folder of Company of Voices Resources.